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's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," written by two economics professors. they write -- the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s. the portion of adults working is four percentage points below its peak in 2000. our question to you
recognition technology is still a work in progress. while investigators in the boston marathon bombing in april had multiple images of both suspects, the technology did not come up with a match. they were not identified by their faces but by their fingerprints. authorities won't say what went wrong. but one possibility is that government databanks, through which the photos would've been searched, are not big enough. but as we first reported in may, the f.b.i. is working on expanding its database, businesses are tapping facial recognition to sell us stuff, and computer scientists are upgrading the technology. so, here it comes! oh, my. this may look like a high school science project, but this is carnegie mellon's cylab, a world-class research center. look at that! marios savvides and his students outfitted this ordinary toy drone with their new advanced facial recognition software that locks in on a face from a distance and then identifies it. >> drone: hello, lesley. nice to see you again. >> stahl: it got it. the students are taking surveillance technology to the next level. they can
picture doesn't usually change. >> at some point, the technology gets better, it gets more -- the nasdaq has more competition these days. >> they're the first one. they should be the ones that have it down. >> you would think. >> and no one is going back to specialists. we'll have all the politicians calling for more regulation. you know that's going to happen, even though the s.e.c. is already, some people think fairly heavily handed and we'll talk about that in the executive exchange in a second. other headline today, moodys placed the ratings of six of the largest banks in the u.s. on review. the agency is weighing the possibility of lesser government support for those institutions. we're talking about goldman sachs, jpmorgan, morgan stanley, wells fargo all under review with a possible implication for downgrade. bank of america and citigroup are being evaluated in their words with the direction uncertain -- already sort of -- >> see what is interesting there, right? the stronger the banks, the stronger banks are being downgraded because s&p says, oh, it all falls apart, they won't ge
world reports. >> reporter: the l-0 uses a technology to race over long distances at superfast speeds. it's called superconducting magnetic levation. officials have just opened a new track for test runs in central japan. it's nearly 43 kilometers long. commercial service isn't scheduled to begin until 2027. once the train is up and running it will take people from tokyo to nagoya in just 40 minutes. one hour less than a bullet train trip. >> translator: i was impressed by the speed and its quietness surprised me. >> translator: the train will make it much easier to get around. i'm excited. >> translator: the l-0 will drastically change japan's economy and society. this technology will help propel japan ahead in the world. >> reporter: engineers first began working on the train nearly half a century ago. they've kept at it ever since. in 2003, a prototype reached 581 kilometers per hour, a record that still stands. special magnets hold the key to the train's speed. the l-0 has superconducting electromagnets along the outside. they make it possible for the train to levitate and raise al
engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >>> it's time for "power pitch" where we give innovative companies 60 seconds. let's see if this company has what it takes to be the next big thing. >> on today's "power pitch" we have a founder who wants you to get your online news from avatars, people or puppies, who will read it to you. i'm not kidding. freddie laker is ceo of guide. he's created the world's first 24-hour internet radio station. and more recently, he's consulted brands like coca-cola and espn on digital strategy. well, this is his "power pitch." >> hi, i'm freddie laker, owner and founder of guide. we developed an application that turns your online news in social stream like facebook or twitter into tv. our goal is to allow you to watch your favorite news instead of having to read it. we're doing this using a combination of the latest technology in speech technology, avatar tech that changes static online news pages into a video news show very much like wha
the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >> well, i think to be honest, russian and chinese, these are authoritarian governments. this is a client state. they are worried about, the only thing chinese care about is continuing access to oil supplies out of the region. syria is not much importance to any of us in terms of national security. i think they are symbolic. they will halt legitimacy through the u.n. they won't oppose us on the ground. the question will be, if we pull off this strike with 200 tomahawks some time this weekend, what's the likely outcome? it is unpredictable. unlikely to be good. you want to use military power and tell the u.s. air force and navy, you've got 60 days to bring down the assad regime, they'll do it. there's no question. then we will live with the follow-on war in which they try and eliminate the christians, the -- et cetera. >> thank you for your thoughts today. >> thank you. >> bill, not a lot of good options f
the school bus. several companies are competing for the business. >> technology itself and iris image is nothinging more than the colored portion of your eye. every time a child boards and/or exits the school bus, the parent will get an e-mail or text message and they will get that image of the child's photograph. google map of where they boarded or exited the school bus as well as the time and date. >> reporter: eye lock is another rice scanning company. its technology is being use order school buses along with high security offices and banks. >> our scanning for security la around for a while. but it is getting more popular. that's because advances in technology mean the scanners can be built quicker and cheaper. this scanner is for airports. >> welcome. welcome. >> reporter: while iris scanning may be effective, it does raise concerns, especially when it is used in schools. >> i would -- wonder where the database for this information is going to go naturally. >> reporter: for now, the information collected by the scanners is owned by the school district. but as the market expands,
unveiled a newly developed technology that automatically stops a car from colliding with a bicycle. volvo's system applies the brakes when windshield cameras as well as radar and infrared ray bumper sensors find an object in front is getting dangerously close. the technology works even when a bicycle faulters in the path of a car. systems have trouble detecting fast-moving bicycles, but the company says its swifter imagery analysis by the windshield cameras helps prevent a collision. >> if we look into the data, the national data, we can see that cyclist is one of the top three fatalities in traffic. so that's why volvo now launched the cyclist detection functionality. >> the company plans to price the system at around $2,000. >>> people in china are crowding onto beaches to get some relief from the summer sun. they've been reminded for years to cover up, but these days some women are taking the advice to another level. nhk world's hiroshi hamaguchi explains. >> reporter: this beach is a popular resort spot. on sundays it attracts a couple of hundred thousands people including young group
, in autos and technology, even pop culture. on the economic front, though, the country's emergence from poverty have also been noteworthy. today we're kicking off a week of special reports on the trillion-dollar economy. chloe chao reports on why the export-oriented growth model that has driven so much of south korea's successes now needs to change. >> reporter: this 35-year-old is a wife and mother in a typical working-class family. she quit her job 1 1/2 years ago to care for her three sons, all of whom are under the age of 5. with her husband's income of 6,000 u.s. dollars a month, they're just making ends meet. >> translator: both of us came into this marriage with debts of our own. and because of this, it's not easy. if we started out without any debt, i think we'd be able to save about 50% of what we earn. >> reporter: and it's families like lee es that show the economy. so much so that president park made it one of her first major initiatives. in march she announced a $1.35 billion fund to provide debt relief to korean households. >> there has been a decoupling between the growth
technologies, unites technologies made the acquisition of goodrich. the airspace is on fire in the country. you default to that that's an international market that must be based here. like united technology, it's a smart company. >> street research, not too much this week. the deutsche bank upgrading dollar tree to buy to hold. sales incrementally positive on the dollar stores. you not only follow the stores you manage to get into one or two every weekend. >> i do prefer dollar tree. if you ever bought candy the a cvs or walgreens, you're a sucker. >> is that significant? >> if you buy readers, i can't see a thing, you're playing full praise. you go there, they're a fraction. >> the stock's up so much. what could happen there? >> the board is all up, you've got a standstill expiring or expiring. there's continued chatter, could you see, could you try to force a deal between family dollar and dollar tree. >> dollar tree had good numbers last week. >> dollar general. >> dollar general, frankly a buyback king. they have -- they spin -- >> walmart have any interest? >> walmart? >> i'm not saying an
for work? automation and technology make it so that in fact we need fewer human hands in a bunch of arenas where we used to so that means we have to think about work quite differently and about the society needs for the contribution. and i think that we will have our best chance at getting to some of those changes if we have a really fully multiracial, multi justice movement and that is explicit about race and the way that gordon has mentioned that engages everybody that has a stake in taking their racial order a part. the changing demographics of america present such an opportunity for us. we are coming into a period that we can redefine what it means to be american because for too long that has been a title that has been captured and owned by white folks. and many of us that have been here for 200, 300 years, since the very beginning since before there were white folks, you know, it really is not feeling like we were american. we were the other. so we are in a moment where we are getting ready to actually calotte back and own what it means to be american and i think from that will come a
, it is not a downer. >> although on the technologies we saw yesterday reported by the journal 660% of the ipos here have been tech-related which is not a reflection of a great deal of excitement. >> well, i bridle at that, because i think that biotech should be considered tech, and b biotech is the hottest year i can remember. a lot of the biotech companies came public and found people suspicious saying that people will buy anything. >> we are not there yet. >> no? >> really? the ipos that we have looked at, it does not appear that the quality of them has diminished anywhere near the level that we saw where you could put zseven sentences on paper and then open up public. >> and the perkulation of the stocks, and if you want to see some group dole we well, and tht of bristol-myers -- >> we mentioned that the nasdaq was positive on the month and it just went negative, so we did jinx that. over to bob pisani on the floor. >> oil is up at a six-month high, and chevron and exxon up, but 28 other stocks to the dow are to the downside. rough seas over in the emerging markets, and indian and philippine and
. she says the halt was serious and she reinforce our collective commitment to addressing technological vulnerabilities of exchanges. former s.e.c. chief harvey pitt weighed in on cnbc's "kudlow report." >> this should not have happened. and the inability to tell people which securities would trade and which were opening ahead of others, that's pure chaos and it is wholly unacceptable. >> nasdaq chairman and ceo will be on u.s. "squawk box" today on a first on cnbc interview. that's at 7:30 a.m. eastern. head to our website to find out what is next for nasdaq. a number of analysts say the stock exchange's credibility is likely to bare the brunt of the fallout with the implications limited for broader trading and u.s. stocks, all on cnbc.com. >>> the nasdaq flash freeze is the latest in a stripg ng of trading snafus in recent years. the flash crash in 2010, that botched that ipo, the fake ap tweet and the erroneous trades earlier this week from goldman sachs all raised questions about whether market participants are comfortable with the risk computer glitches can cause to markets. do you
, if you can't kill him, if you can't kill him, do we know, do we have the technology, i assume we do, basically we can hit all of these individual buildings as you were saying, his country place in the mountains? do we know, you know, these tomorrow mohawk missiles will go up to the traffic lights, stop, make a right turn and go down the chimney? these are awesome weapons of war. what would hold us back from making use of that? apart from the politics of it, what would hold us back from really just decimating damascus and all the environs. >> the only issue that's holding us back is the politics of it and all the administration has a fear of repreefg the iraq war, i don't see how because nobody's talking about boots on the ground. the real fear they should have is of reprieving what bill clinton did in 1998 with another three-day strike on saddam hussein, it was called operation desert fox. it was seen as a political distraction on the eve of his impeachment. it strengthened saddam hussein's hand internationally, not weakening it. a de minimis strike is going to reap the worst of bot
's prime minister wants. he's visiting gulf states to sell them japanese nuclear technology. he want the reactors at home back working and to build more. his supporters say it is an economic and strategic necessity. translator:>> both china and south korea are building many new plants and trying to export technology. it is inferior to the japanese technology. we need to export it. reporter:>> japan can market itself as learning from its mistakes. but others say the discovery at fukashima dai-ichi of new radiation leaks will turn many japanese against nuclear power again. >> these power plants are sort of leaking like supervisors if you like. that, i think, is, in fact shocking people again into rethinking their rethought positions. public opinion is very, very fragile. reporter:>> but the japanese economy is fragile too, fossil fuels imported to replace nuclear power are costing japan 40 billion a year. japanese will have to decide which is more expensive, fixing their damaged nuclear industry or living without it. al jazeera, tokyo. >> coming up shortly, we'll have all the latest ac
access to the missile technology that may be being discovered at this time, but these types of chemical weapons are not very, very difficult to manufacture. >> i think all of us have questions about what really happened on the ground. where the source of the chemicals came from, where the attack came from, who promoted the attack and i think what you're seeing in general is a significant amount of caution in news reports and official statements as to where those attacks came from and who actually conducted those attacks so until those questions are answered i think people are very, very hesitant not only to make official statements but also to suggest a possible response. >> reporter: to other news now anti-coup protest in egypt defied nighttime curfews in several cities and this was a protest south of cairo and marches in the city district and minya. the demonstrations shrunk since it killed hundreds. the opposition is calling for peaceful protests against the government and want the ruling and party to quit power and says they miss managed the economy and failed to provide law an ord
technology in their effort to detect new flames in that mammoth fire. >> why fast food may be anything but today. the strike that could seriously delay customers who want fries with that. ♪ theme >> president obama is deciding whether to launch a military strike against syria. he is expected to meet congressional leaders today to layout his proof that syrian president bashar al-assad was behind last week's chemical attack. hundreds of people died and western leaders are demanding a response. the u.n. security council will not approve action and britain's parliament seems to be scaling back its calls for an immediate strike. in a pbs interview, president obama expressed he has no interest in an open ended conflict with syria but said that assad's regime has dough employed chemical weapons. >> if we are saying in a clear and decisive but very limited way we send a shot across the bow saying stop doing this, that can have a positive impact on our national security over the long term and may have a positive impact in the sense that chemical weapons are not used again on innocent civilian
the cartoons he then becomes a pioneer of radio technology. >> people cast in the bottom of the grand canyon is thought he is the first person to broadcast to the whole world and then a taferping its microphone to a parachute jumper so people can hear what it will be like jumping from a plane and what it sounds like is this. >> e oh my god. >> but did is that kind of curiosity that does s so appealing. >> yeah. and he's an appealing guy ultimately because he's such a goof bauchlt he find its everything curious and fascinating and interesting and weefermentd he's like a child. >> got it. >> it's a fascinating story, thank you so much for being here. >> curious manson the book shelves now, neil thompson. >> that's our show, please join us tomorrow at 11:00, here it is our moment of zen. >> you can never remember what kim kardashian did in the first place that you know who kim kardashian is but there she is. and now you know who she is so whatever she does, then you got to cover it i feel
tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. david: a little bit of bearish news on the housing front. mortgage applications falling for the third straight week. the number fell 2.5% this week from last week as a result of the 30-year fixed mortgage rate hitting a two-year high at 4.58%. that is a full percentage point higher than what it was in may. so is the housing recovery a recent bright spot in our economy beginning to slow down a little? cheryl: joining us now in first on fox business interview is ara hovnanian, ceo of hovnanian enterprises. you were preparing for this. you and i spoke on the "countdown to the closing bell." you knew there would be a built after downtick for applications. how are you weathering things right now? >> i think we're weathering fine. we have a great bac
cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >>> there have been examples of success within black america that would have been unimaginable a half century ago. as already been noted, black unemployment has remained almost twice as high as white employment. latino unemployment is close behind. the gap in wealth between races has not lessened. it's grown. >> that was dr. martin luther king and then president barack obama speaking 50 years apart about racial inequality in this country. so just how much progress have we made? we're looking at this through a financial, economic and business lens, and then the question is how much more do we still need to do? here n
using sophisticated technology in their effort to detect new flames in that mammoth fire. >> a new kind of living for the budget minded, but not everyone is crazy about the trend. ♪ theme >> reports are out this morning that the russians are doing that year part to turn up pressure on the united states. reuters is saying that a military source within russia's intertax news agency claims a missile cruiser is being moved to the mediterranean. president obama has military options but has not decided whether to launch a military strike on occur i can't. obama's not likely to get u.n. approval and it appears britain is reigning in it's approval of a strike. the president said he has approved assad has responsibility for chemical attacks. a classified report will be delivered on the intelligence that led him to believe that assad was behind the attacks. obama said a declassified report could soon be released to the public. just hours after the president talked about syria in a p.b.s. interview, he received pushback from congress from house speaker john boehner. he sent a letter to the presi
life and the transplant surgerying with the whole body of technology and development of medicine, cleats cholesterol, we tell that story through my case and laid against the background of my time in public service. and i was uniquely blessed in many respects, obviously, you can never express enough gratitude for a donor or the donor's family. you cannot talk about what i went through and i survived it what without talking about liz, her sister, and my wife. we celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next week. [applause] i -- when you go through everything we went through as a family, and the only way to go through it is as a family, if at all possible. i wake up every morning with a smile on my face thankful for a new day i never expected to see. and basically what the book is about, it's simon and shuster love it. it's called heart, american medical odyssey. i think it's a pretty good book. it's not political. it has nothing to do with politics. i suppose you could say that all of pry my critics say i never had a heart. [laughter] may want to have that problem -- this challenge
this postponement they say is due to technology. we all are familiar now with the debt clock. there is also the cost. if they implement any parts and they don't work it could cost even more. how does the president develop a strategy that actually gets this plan to move past all of this? >> the key real date that matter, jamie, is january 1st. that is when all the policies or actual insurance policies, health insurance policies would go into effect. , what you're seeing today, today's revelation isn't all that great. it doesn't, what they're talking about doing is delaying these exchanges going into the marketplace, oregon already said it would do that. move it from october first to october 15th. the administration promised everything would start on time but we're talking about 20% of the nation's economy being altered here by this law. whether the marketplace exchanges go into, into place october 1st or october 12th doesn't really matter. what matters is that the marketplace opens up sometime in october and that the policies go into effect on january 1st. and at that point i do agree, at some point
. this is my booster club. this is the guy who's graduating ready for a great career in technology. [ male announcer ] in 2012, 90% of devry university grads actively seeking employment had careers in their field in 6 months. join the 90%. learn how at devry.edu. the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. dive into labor day with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity. to experience the precision handling of the lexus performance vehicles, including the gs and all-new is. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. time to have new experiences with a familiar keyboard. to update our status without opening an app. to have all our messages in one place. to browse... and share... faster than ever. ♪ it's time to do everything better than before. the new blackberry q10. it's time. >>> welcome back to "squawk on the street." our road map begins with gdp revised up and jobless claims down. we'll find out if this will be enough to keep investors positive despite geopolitical head winds that are ever changing timelines for possible military action in syria. possible strike on the ground would
results in areas that will enable kids to get good jobs and science technology education, mathematics is something this country needs. is there going to be a special emphasis on encouraging people to take courses in that area where there is a lack of stills i skills, a lot of companies are locking for people, in many cases hiring them from abroad? can't we do a better job there? can't the government do more to encourage people to take those courses and succeed in those courses? >> we feed to, obviously, as you said, absolutely, correctly, so many jobs in the future in the stems field. yes with eneed to focus that in college. there, it's too late. we need to look at the k-12 system as well. the president is challenging us to recruit 10,000 stem teachers so in 3rd, 4th, 5th grade, that i have access to teachers passionate about teaching that content. if we wait until college with key do some things. we have to look at the continuum, start with our babies. >> is there an argument if you offer a pell grant, perhaps a true capitalist would say you should offer more money at a better rate i
you want to play cyclical areas of the economy, like technology and industrials and the defensive trade and yield oriented trade is fading. adam: as we wrap up, you know, with the potential for a pull back stick to your strategy, now is not the time to get out, but stay the course and weather this; correct? >> look, i think that one of the mistakes vinest res make all the time is losing that discipline around particularly volatile periods of the time. there's never a time not to be disciplined. to the extent you are inclined and want to look for a slightly better entry point, you may get that. we tell investors not to be cues about it. it's not a winning strategy. adam: senior vice president and chief investment strategist, thank you for joining us on "the closing bell" -- or "count down to the closing bell," it rings in luff ri 45 minutes, another great day for the facebook ceo, shares rallying, but is that stock over valued? yep, according to one guy we'll talk to, we'll talk to a business professor who wrote the book on valuations and the race for new cancer drugs sparks a more
is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. arthel: today we have some incredible followup to a story we first brought you last month. a small business owner in atlanta made it her mission to help save orphans in india. and she's doing it by selling tea. well, when we covered the stoir it took off, even going viral and now that business owner has some amazing news to share. here are the details from atlanta. so tell us how the publicity helped out the lady's cause. >> this is a great story. the tea shop has received an outpouring of support from people wanting to help. the owner said she's received numerous calls and email messages from church groups, businesses and individuals all around the world. listen. >> i think i received around 600 emails since the first hour that the talk piece aired. i was very u
access to those sites, they have at their disposal technology that will make their mission relative simple. they spoke to al jazeera about exactly what is involved. >> the u.n. weapons inspectors will have sophisticated equipment with them and simpler equipment, the sort of stuff that we have here. first of all, i suspect most of the inspectors got this clipped to their belt which will identify if there is an agent, a nerve agent. it will tell you if it's sarin or others and will test for mustard gas. it seems that the most logical explanation was that a nerve agent was used and probably sarin. we have a very simple device here that works with antibodies, and will identify up to eight toxins or pathogens like anthrax, ricin, and this is a quick test that could be done in the area. you'll get an answer in a few minutes. we start off with an one size fits off respirator that can be put on in a few seconds. this will give you comprehensive protection against even the strongest chemical weapons for some period. i think allied with that is basic advise, ideally you should move upward bec
nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. [ male announcer ] may your lights always be green. [ tires screech ] ♪ and your favorite songs always playing. [ beeping ] ♪ may you never be stuck behind a stinky truck. [ beeping ] ♪ may things always go your way. but it's good to be prepared... just in case they don't. let's go places, safely. chose prego traditional over ragu traditional. prego?! but i buy ragu. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made. [ pop muzak plays ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. >> today is august the 28th. questi we begin with a fox news alert. we are on the verge of another war in the mid eels. we have grand new evidence surfacing that could force a u.s. strike against syria. >> it was supposed to honor the people who died september 11th but one group says it is plain offensive. can they have a 911 memorial torn down. >> they are talking about the constitution.
not everyone is happy that technology is taking over. >>> coming up here, media outlets covering egypt's revolution are being squeezed. journalists are arrested and channels are being threatened with closure. >>> plus, one of the most wanted men in india is arrested after five years on the run. >>> in sports the nfl agrees to a multi-million dollar payout over the head injuries sustained by players. details are coming up. >>> a car bomb in the iraqi city of samarra killed 16 people, and the vehicle blew up in the busy market town 100 miles north of the capital, baghdad. at least 27 others were wounded. it comes only a day after a wave of bombings in the iraqi capital killed at least 75 people. >>> pakistan has ordered the retrial of a doctor who helped the cia find osama bin laden. he had worked for u.s. intelligence by collecting dna to verify bin laden's presence. he was sentenced to 33 years in prison on may 2012 for being a member of a militant group. both he and the group deny this. >>> one of the most wanted men in india has been arrested. he's the alleged founder of the indian m
in technology so we have some of the best facilities and our part of the world. >> tourists traveling for medical reasons spend between 40 and $60 billion a year. the market is growing around 20%. brazil received about 50,000 medical travelers a year from different parts of the world. mostly from neighboring latin american countries like ecuador, bolivia, and uruguay. mostly for cosmetic surgery. foreign patients who come to brazil for treatment can be roughly divided into two groups. there are those from rich countries, europeans and north americans who come here because medical procedures are cheaper. there are those from the developing nations, from latin america and africa who come to brazil because they can find top-quality hospitals for those who can pay. brazil has 25 hospitals accredited by the joint commission international, an organization that certifies the quality of medical services worldwide. sÃo paulo is the most sought after destination. >> we have an occupancy rate between 80% and 100% and eight accredited hospitals of sÃo paulo. this is something that has to be sor
by slipping on some goggles. how will virtual reality technology transform our culture? economics correspondent paul solman takes a closer look on making sense. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. margaret? >> woodruff: and again to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are seven more. >> warner: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. but before we go, a reminder: the news doesn't stop on friday, and soon, neither will the "newshour." starting in september, join our own hari sreenivasan every saturday and sunday for a 30-minute look at the latest news from around the nation and the world. the all-new "pbs newshour weekend" premieres on saturday, september 7. for more information, visit pbs.org. i'm margaret warner. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. >> majo
, and even travel the halls of his school, with the help of some futuristic technology. joleen chaney reports. >> "do you see me conrad?" >> reporter: he does, but not how you'd expect him to. conrad sees his classmates, and they see him -- his face in the monitor of a telepresence system, a robot. he's had to miss a lot of class because of severe allergies and a very rare immune system disorder, so rare it doesn't even have a name. as far as his family knows, little conrad is the only one in the world who has it. and they hope a bone marrow transplant will get him healthy enough to enjoy a normal life. he leaves this weekend for denver, and is taking his new robot with him. >> "i just have to have it because i'm going to denver for something called a bone marrow transplant and i'm going to be leaving for awhile. and that's all i pretty much know." >> reporter: this is his second time to tinker with the robot. >> "you take the mouse. i just put it there and whoa, whoa!" >> reporter: his little fingers maneuvering across the keys and mouse. >> "hey, conrad." >> "hey." >> reporter: directing th
is an exclusive interview with ceo of samsung. why they're betting big on wearable technology. and tune in at 10:40, we'll learn how the french government plans to plug a euro deficit. at 11:05 cet we'll set aside some brazil and be joined by a guest who says the country's central bank could hike rates as they struggle with a weakening currency and imported inflation. jpmorgan's list of legal challenges gets longer. we'll get the details from new york at 11:45. all that and plenty more over the next couple of hours. any thoughts or comments, e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. first, speculation is growing that the u.s. and allies will launch a missile strike against syria within days after widespread condemnation from global leaders about the alleged use of chemical weapons by the assad regime. speaking last night, u.s. vice president joe biden said there was no doubt chemical weapons were used and those responsible should be held accountable. the british prime minister david cameron's office backed the white house earlier today saying both governments had clear evidence the regime carried out the a
of interceptors and at this point we don't have the capability to intercept from china but the technology is progressing steadily and slowly so it may be beyond the ten year horizon. what does the dialogue look like and what does that act will dynamic as the numbers and keep the of the interceptors improved and is there a way that we can talk with china to keep the strategic stability without costing them to go higher and more sophisticated in their nuclear capability. >> i hope there is that it seeks to to dialogue and china has a long track record of resisting american and its own leadership in this dialogue area. let me be clear you have a good modifier but almost an arms race or an arms race response recall ten years ago rumsfeld articulated a concern defending the number of nuclear weapons under the moscow treaty, the strategic treaty defending that right number in part because it dealt with a potential sprint to parity by china. ten years later there was no sprint or parity so we need to be careful as we characterize what china is up to. in my assessment china is modernizing and div
and the technology area, the people invested generally the table with money to invest, were able to benefit from it. then you have the decline at the end of the london administration and on into the getting of the bush and administration, and then you and the bush menstruation with an economic downtown -- downturn, and you will see that the attribution actually flattens. because the people with money and with investments and to bear a bigger share of the economic downturn. years,ke it up in the up but they lose in the down years. so you actually see the kind of perverse results. this time around and in this economic upturn, we really have not seen that same type of a dynamic. and so if we really want to address the income distribution -- and to remember, clinton taxes, any distribution got more disparate. not because he raised taxes, ok, because taxes are not the way to address the distribution. the way to address the distribution is through fundamental skill levels, education and a vibrant economy. of income the shares held by the various income quintiles, and we see the share of taxes. taxn, you
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